Surgical Reconstructions for Scapulothoracic Winging: The Boston Shoulder Institute Experience

Matthew F. Dilisio, M.D., Laurence D. Higgins, M.D., Alex Girden, and Jon J.P. Warner, M.D.BSI
Shoulder Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
Sports and Shoulder Service, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

December 1, 2013

 

 

Total Number of Surgeries Performed from 2006-2013: 27
Pectoralis Major Transfer for Winging: 18
Scapulothoracic Fusion: 9

 

Pectoralis Major Transfer for Scapular Winging

scapwinging1scapwinging2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total number of surgeries performed: 18
Average patient age at the time of surgery: 35.9 years
Average length of follow-up: 18.9 Months
Gender: 72% Female, 18% Male

 

How much pain relief was achieved?

“How much pain are you in, with 0 representing no pain at all, and 10 representing the worst
pain imaginable?”

scapwinging3

 

How satisfied were our patients?

“Are you satisfied with the results of your surgery, and would you have the surgery again?”
Yes: 90.1%
No: 9.9%

What were the functional outcomes of our patients?

“What is the function of your shoulder as a percentage of normal? 100% represents normal
function, and 0% represents that you have no use of your shoulder.”

scapwinging4

 

Complication Rate: 0%

 

Scapulothoracic Fusion for Scapular Winging

scapwinging5

 

Total number of surgeries performed: 9
Average patient age at the time of surgery: 39.4 years
Average length of follow-up: 17.3 Months
Gender: 33% Female, 67% Male

 

How much pain relief was achieved?

“How much pain are you in, with 0 representing no pain at all, and 10 representing the worst
pain imaginable?”

scapwinging6

 

 

How satisfied were our patients?

“Are you satisfied with the results of your surgery, and would you have the surgery again?”
Yes: 100%
No: 0%

 

What were the functional outcomes of our patients?

“What is the function of your shoulder as a percentage of normal? 100% represents normal
function, and 0% represents that you have no use of your shoulder.”scapwinging7

scapwinging9

Complication Rate: 11%

  • 1 complication was observed out of 9 patients. This was a postoperative seroma that was treated nonoperatively with antibiotics and resolved.
  • 1 patient developed a fibrous union with an otherwise excellent result.
  • 2 Patients required removal of hardware.

 

For information about the diagnosis and treatment of scapulothoracic winging, please refer to the following Boston Shoulder Institute Module:

http://bostonshoulderinstitute.com/patient-resources/injuries/scapulothoracic-winging/