Standards of Professionalism

OUR COMMITMENT TO STANDARDS OF PROFESSIONALISM:

The following is an excerpt from The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Statement on SOPs, (http://www3.aaos.org/member/profcomp/sop.cfm)

Ø The benefit to the patient must be the primary goal and must not be compromised. Orthopaedic surgeons, like all physicians, have an ethical obligation to present themselves and the services they provide to patients in a clear and accurate manner.

Ø The primary focus of the orthopaedic profession is care of the patient. As part of their lifetime commitment to patients, orthopaedic surgeons must maintain specialized knowledge and skills through participation in continuing medical education programs, seminars, and professional meetings. Often, these professional functions are sponsored by the community of medical device manufacturers, pharmaceutical companies, and other businesses who play an important role supporting continuing medical education (CME) events and the development of new technologies that contribute to the ongoing patient-physician relationship. This collaborative effort ensures that patients have the best surgical outcomes through the invention and testing of new technology, research and evaluation of existing technology, and continued education of orthopaedic surgeons.

Ø Cooperative relationships between orthopaedic surgeons and industry benefit patients. Orthopaedic surgeons are best qualified to provide innovative ideas and feedback, conduct research trials, serve on scientific advisory boards, and serve as faculty to teach the use of new technology. Orthopaedic surgeons, in an effort to improve patient care, rely on industry to bring their creative ideas to fruition. A collaborative relationship between orthopaedic surgeons and industry is necessary to improve patient care, but must be carefully scrutinized to avoid pitfalls of improper inducements, whether real or perceived.

Ø Orthopaedic surgeons must be mindful of potential conflicts of interest with patient care in pursuing academic and commercial ventures. A conflict of interest exists when professional judgment concerning the well being of the patient has a reasonable chance of being influenced by other interests of the physician.

Ø Disclosure of a conflict of interest is required in communications to patients, the public and colleagues. The benefit to the patient must be the primary goal and must not be compromised. Orthopaedic surgeons, like all physicians, have an ethical obligation to present themselves and the services they provide to patients in a clear and accurate manner.

Ø OUR DISCLOSURES:

1. Dr. Warner has designed a rotator cuff fixation device and receives royalties from Tornier Company. He receives no benefits from its use in any of the hospitals in which he has privileges. He has given lectures, on occasion, on surgical technique in Tornier Sponsored symposiums.

2. Dr. Warner serves on the Board of Directors of the San Diego Shoulder Institute, a not-for-profit educational foundation.

3. The Harvard Shoulder Fellowship Receives financial support from Industry sources. These funds support all aspects of the Postgraduate fellowship program. These include the following companies:

Ø Smith and Nephew Endoscopy

Ø Mitek, Johnson and Johnson

Ø Arthrex Company

Ø Breg Company

Ø Don Joy Surgical

Such support is essential in order to permit us to continue training the next generation of leaders in management of shoulder problems. We receive no support from The MGH, the BWH or Harvard. All such funds are managed in the Carter Rowe Shoulder Fellowship Fund and oversight is maintained by the Partners Education Committee. Such funds support all material costs of the Shoulder Fellowship and its academic mission. For further information please see our Fellowship Description on the heading menu of our webpage, www.bosshin.com